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20130318
20130326
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it. and push the only problem that divide us today. consider the facts. take energy, with our new drilling technology, america will soon have an energy surplus. this is trillions of dollars in new wealth for americans. trillions of dollars. oreign-policy not overly influenced by oil. how about food? america will be the saudi arabia of grain in a century when the world is clamoring for more food. just as crude oil determines the wealth and power of nations in the latter part of the last century, we will do so in this century. rapid advances are transformed at a breathtaking pace. manufacturing jobs that were shipped to china a decade ago are now returning to america. beingime, the work is performed by our robots. the good news is, there are robots built in america by american workers. by low energy cost, they create a new wave of energy manufacturing in this country. classes of diseases are on the verge of being eradicated by manipulating individual molecules on the surfaces of living sales. -- living cells. never getting lost, never having accidents, already a prototype car has dr
to work this year with specific and targeted investments, while investing also in education, energy, research and infrastructure and keeping our commitment to america's seniors. our plan is fair, balanced, reasonable and responsible. it is pro-growth, pro-people, pro-america and approach favored by the majority in this country. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. horsford: thank you, congresswoman bass. and to focus on jobs and investing in our future, the fact that is pro-growth, pro-people and 70% of the american people support this type of approach is why the c.b.c. is offering this as an alternative to the house republican majority. and to speak further on the pro-growth needs of this budget, my representative -- my colleague, i should say in the new freshman class. it's been a delight to get to know her, the gentlelady from ohio, representative beatty. mrs. beatty: thank you so much. thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to discuss house budget committee chairman ryan's fiscal year 2014 budget and democratic alternatives that work. i first want to thank my colleague, mr. ho
of time and a lot of energy and effort making sure that scott walker and ron johnson won that primary. that was our decision. i would not have appreciated the national party coming in and telling the state of wisconsin i do not know about scott walker i think we will go with mark neumann. that is ridiculous. and that is the point. it is not that we want to handcuff ourself it is just not practical. it is not right. >> governors have gone on to be some of the most significant republican presidents in the last century -- nixon, reagan, bush. is the party doing enough to support the rising star governors once they get past the endorsement process? >> that is the plan for 2013 and 2014. i know our state parties do a lot of work. the rga does. we have a different party, too. 15 or 20 years ago or maybe more there wasn't an nrcc. there wasn't 10, 20 different 527's.r pacs and we have a big group of organizations involved in anding republicans conservatives elected. my job is to put together not only the best infrastructure and data and mechanics but we have our primary system that needs to
and mike gossly. i'm on energy and commerce now. but it was the inclusion of the minority in the legislative process and it was at the committee level you really blished your relationships. i know whether we spend less time or more time in washington nothing is going to work unless we come together at those times when we really get to know one another. in my opinion that is at the committee level. if we can do something and work something there. i'm not sure how leadership exerts its leadership on chairs and ranking members of committees and subcommittees. but there in lies the answer. it's a tremendous strength. i've always been hopeful that the chairs and the ranking members would understand the importance of including the minority. you know what happens when you are in the majority, you are going to win every one of the votes. it's just the way it was. but things change drastically. that is one of the answers. i don't think that we're ever going to get away from being partisan. your question of whether willing tons compromise and that you will survive an election becau
a lot of energy and resources into the inspections. there was very little reason at that point to be competent the inspections would be more productive this time around than they were before. what was interesting looking back is that we have lots of debate over should we do inspections, how should we do inspections, but there wasn't a debate from the right or the left or from our intelligence community colleagues, no one quarrels with the proposition that saddam hussein might not . ve wmd we argued over a lot of things, whether we should go to war, we have lots of debate over the building block issues that made at the general proposal that saddam hussein had wmd, but we never argued a central point. both sides, the left and right or wrong. the worldorld was -- was convinced that what was being hit in iraq wasn't there anymore. being in the middle of that argument was the toughest job i've tackled as an intelligence officer. it has had a lasting and i think positive effect on how we view our business. we have examined ourselves pretty thoroughly since then. i will turn to some l
to serve under a couple of chairs. it is totally different. i'm on energy and commerce now. it was the inclusion of the minority and the legislative process and it was the committee level that you establish your relationships. i know if we spend more or less time in washington nothing is going to work unless we come together at those times when we get to know one another. in my opinion, that is at the committee level. if we can do something and work something there -- i'm not sure how leadership exerts its influence on chairs and ranking members of committees and sub committees. but there lies the answer. i think it is a tremendous strength and i've always been hopeful that the chairs and the ranking members would understand the importance of including the minority. you know what happens, when you're the majority you're going to win every one of the votes. that is the way it was. but things change drastically. i think that is one of the answers. i don't think we're going to get away from being partisan. the question is, your willingness to compromise. that's it. and you wil
to supplement what would be the federal efforts. >> there is so much negative energy for opponents of the ach. when we are talking to our neighbors, not everyone knows it is a good thing. some people think they should wait. we want people to sign up. talking to a community-based organization -- there are a lot of resources but there will not be a perfect plan handed to you. do not wait. you can in do what your community to seek out these resources. to not wait until it comes to you. go to it. >> [indiscernible] one of the things we are trying to do is pass along the because it has been well articulated that there is a traditional role in helping the people they serve get access to these expanded programs. we need to put the tools in place. we coordinate a united states conference on aids every year. --bring healthcare divisors we bring healthcare divisors. this is how we will get ready to get the folks with the ach. you can meet in new orleans september 11. we have so much good information. i know you want to ask questions. we want to open it up for questions to our panelists and also for jen
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7